Winter CSA Week #3

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST

This is for the third week of Winter CSA, which will be delivered on 12/12 or 12/13 depending on your pick up location.

Red Cabbage  Blue Goose Farm
Green Meat Radishes  Clarion River Organics
Ginger – Crighton Farm
Shallots – Crighton Farm
Granny Smith/Rome Apples – Dawson’s Orchards
Hydroponic Lettuce – Harmony Grove
Winter Squash* – Kistaco Farm/Matthews Farm
Chevre  – River View Dairy
Apple Butter  – Penn’s Corner Farm Alliance
Red Beets – Riverbend Acres
White Potatoes – Weeping Willow Farm

Vegan shares will receive rainbow carrots in place of chevre

This week’s shares are Gluten Free

*Shares will receive pie pumpkins, acorn squash, or butternut squash

 


Red Cabbage

Grower: Blue Goose Farm

Store: Keep it wrapped. Wrapping cabbage in plastic and storing it in the crisper section of your refrigerator limits its exposure to air flow, and thus reduces respiration and slows down spoilage. Just as importantly, plastic wrap keeps external moisture out, preventing mold and rot, while helping the cabbage to maintain its internal (cellular) moisture—without which, the cabbage leaves lose their firmness and begin to wilt.

Recipe: Sauteed Red CabbageBraised Red Cabbage, Sweet and Sour German Cabbage

 

Green Meat Radishes

Grower: Clarion River Organics

Store: Keep covered in the crisper drawer.

 

Recipe: Green Radish SaladGreen Radish Soup, Green Radish and Pork Rib Soup

 

 

Ginger

Grower: Crighton Farm

Store: Store the whole, unpeeled ginger root in a resealable plastic bag, with the air pushed out, in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. If part of the ginger has been cut or peeled, be sure to blot it dry with a paper towel before storing.

Recipe: Fresh Ginger Cake, Ginger Cashew Chicken Curry, Hot Sausage and Cabbage Stir Fry

 

Shallots

Grower: Crighton Farm

Store: Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated area for up to 1 month.

Recipe: Caramelized ShallotsRoasted Potatoes and Shallots, Balsamic Roasted Shallots

 

 

 

Hydroponic Lettuce

Grower: Harmony Grove Farm

Store: Leave the heads intact and unwashed until you use them. Then, place them in the crisper drawer in your fridge with some paper towels.They’ll absorb any excess moisture, so your lettuce doesn’t spoil prematurely.  Lettuce bruises easily, so be careful not to shove other foods up against it. Using a storage container is better than a bag, which can end up squished against other items.

 

 

Granny Smith/Rome Apples

Grower: Dawson’s Orchards 

Store: Keep them cool. The ideal storage temperature is 30 to 35 degrees F. with 90 to 95 percent relative humidity. If you don’t have a lot of apples, the refrigerator is a good option. Place them in the crisper drawer in a plastic bag with holes in it or cover the apples with a damp paper towel.

Granny Smith apples are a tart apple that are great for baking!  Throw them into your next apple pie!  Rome Apples are are also a great baking apple as their flesh holds up well when baking.  Try this recipe for baked apples for a warm winter treat!

 

 

Winter Squash

Members will recieve either pie pumpkins, butternut, or acorn squash.

Grower: Kistaco Farm/Matthew Farm

Store:  Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated area for up to 1 month.

Recipe: Homemade Pumpkin  PureeSausage and Apple Stuffed Acorn Squash,  Roasted Butternut Squash Soup 

 

 

Apple Butter

Grower: Penn’s Corner Farm Alliance

Store: Store in your pantry for up to a year!

Recipe: Apple Butter Snickerdoodles, Bacon Biscuits with Apple Butter, Sweet Potatoes with Apple Butter

 

 

 

Red Beets

Grower: Riverbend Acres

Store: Beet roots can be stored in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator for 7-10 days.  You can either store them loose or in a plastic bag.

Recipe: Brown Sugar Glazed BeetsBeet Goat Cheese Tarts, Beet and Feta Burgers

 

 

White Potatoes

Grower: Weeping Willow Farm

Store: Store potatoes in a cool, well ventilated place. Colder temperatures lower than 50 degrees, such as in the refrigerator, cause a potato’s starch to convert to sugar, resulting in a sweet taste and discoloration when cooked.

Recipes: Garlic Butter Potatoes, Garlic Smashed Potatoes

 

Golden Beets

Grower: Riverbend Acres

Store: Keep in fridge until the date on the package.  Chevre will still be good for a few days after the sell by date.

Recipes: Potato Gratin with Goat Cheese, Roasted Butternut with Goat Cheese, Roasted Beet and Goat Cheese Salad

 

 

 

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Winter CSA Week #2

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST

This is for the second week of Winter CSA, which will be delivered on 11/28 and 11/29 depending on your pick up location.

Candy Onions  Blue Goose Farm
Garlic  Blue Goose Farm
Sweet Potatoes – Clarion River Orgaics
Winter Squash – Crighton Farm
Braeburn Apples – Dawson’s Orchards
Hydroponic Lettuce – Harmony Grove
Apple Cider – Kistaco Farm
Eggs – Keim/Jarosinski Farm
Green Cabbage – Nu Way Farm
Watermelon Radishes – Nu Way Farm
Golden Beets – Riverbend Acres
Carrots – Weeping Willow Farm

Vegan shares will receive Penn’s Corner Applesauce in place of eggs.

This week’s shares are Gluten Free

 


Candy Onions

Grower: Blue Goose Farm

Store: Sweet onions have a shorter shelf life than common varieties due to a higher water and sugar content. Thus, it’s important to store them properly. Ideally, sweet onions should be stored in a cool, dark, dry location and spread out for optimum air circulation. Most growers suggest placing onions in a clean pair of pantyhose, with knots tied in between each onion, then hung in a cool, dry place. Just snip off below each knot when you need one.  Stored properly, sweet onions should last in your pantry about ten days to two weeks

Recipe: Caramelized OnionsCandy Onion Rings

 

Garlic

Grower: Blue Goose Farm

Store: Garlic bulbs can be kept in a mesh or wire basket, a small bowl with ventilation holes or even a paper bag. Do not store fresh garlic bulbs in plastic bags or sealed containers. This can cause mold and sprouting.

Recipe: Roasted Garlic Potato Soup, Garlic Parmesan Popovers, Garlic and Rosemary Hummus

 

Sweet Potatoes

Grower: Clarion River Organics

Store: Avoid storing sweet potatoes in the refrigerator, which will produce a hard center and unpleasant taste. Instead, store your sweet potatoes in a cool, dry, well ventilated container. For best results, store them in a basement or root cellar away from strong heat sources. Your sweet potatoes can store for up to two weeks if stored properly.

Recipe: Maple Roasted Sweet Potatoes, Baked Sweet Potatoes

 

Winter Squash

Grower: Crighton Farm

Store: Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated area for up to 1 month.

Recipe: Roasted Spaghetti SquashCinnamon Roasted Butternut Squash

 

 

Hydroponic Lettuce

Grower: Harmony Grove Farm

Store: Leave the heads intact and unwashed until you use them. Then, place them in the crisper drawer in your fridge with some paper towels.They’ll absorb any excess moisture, so your lettuce doesn’t spoil prematurely.  Lettuce bruises easily, so be careful not to shove other foods up against it. Using a storage container is better than a bag, which can end up squished against other items.

 

Braeburn Apples

Grower: Dawson’s Orchards 

Store: Keep them cool. The ideal storage temperature is 30 to 35 degrees F. with 90 to 95 percent relative humidity. If you don’t have a lot of apples, the refrigerator is a good option. Place them in the crisper drawer in a plastic bag with holes in it or cover the apples with a damp paper towel.

Braeburn’s are an all purpose apple, they are crisp and sweet, perfect for eating as is, but are also good in baking pies!

 

Apple Cider

Grower: Kistaco Farm

Store:  Store apple cider in refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Recipe: Apple Cider MargaritaApple Cider Donuts, Cinnamon Pear Tart

 

Eggs

Grower: Jarosinksi/Keim Farm

Store: Eggs should not be stored on the refrigerator door, but in the main body of the refrigerator to ensure that they keep a consistent and cool temperature.

Check out 50 things to do with eggs for recipes and ideas! 

Green Cabbage

Grower: Nu Way Farm

Store: Keep it wrapped. Wrapping cabbage in plastic and storing it in the crisper section of your refrigerator limits its exposure to air flow, and thus reduces respiration and slows down spoilage. Just as importantly, plastic wrap keeps external moisture out, preventing mold and rot, while helping the cabbage to maintain its internal (cellular) moisture—without which, the cabbage leaves lose their firmness and begin to wilt.

Recipes: Beef & Cabbage Stir Fry, Garlic Roasted Cabbage Wedges

 

Watermelon Radishes

Grower: Nu Way Farm

Store: Store in a moist towel/cloth bag or a plastic bag in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator. Enjoy radishes within 3-5 days. Watermelon radishes are edible all the way through– from skin to core. Scrub well before eating.

Recipes: Roasted Watermelon Radishes, Pickled Watermelon Radishes 

 

Golden Beets

Grower: Riverbend Acres

Store: Beet roots can be stored in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator for 7-10 days.  You can either store them loose or in a plastic bag.

Recipes: Lemon Herb Roasted Beets, Golden Beets and Brussels Sprouts

 

Carrots

Grower: Weeping Willow Farm

Store:  Carrots can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a month if stored properly. Cut off carrot greens, place carrots in a containers with lid and cover completely in water. Keep container in the refrigerator, changing the water ever 4-5 days.

Recipe: Carrot PancakesCarrot Coconut SoupCurried Carrots

Summer CSA Week #23 Preview

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST

This is for the November 1st CSA, which is an odd week share

Sweet Onions  Blue Goose Farm
Kale  Clarion River Organics
Leeks – Clarion River Organics/Grow Pittsburgh
D’anjou/Bosc Pears – Dawson’s Orchards
Winter Squash* – Crighton Farm/Kistaco Farm
Apple Cider – Kistaco Farm
Broccoli – Nu Way Farm
Sweet Potatoes – River Bend Acres
Cabbage – Weeping Willow Farm

*Members will receive spaghetti, acorn, or butternut squash

Egg shares will receive eggs from Keim Farm

Cheese shares will receive Allegheny Cheese from Hidden Hills Dairy

**This week’s shares are Vegan and Gluten Free

 

 


Leeks

Grower: Clarion River Organics/Grow Pittsburgh

Store:  Fresh leeks should be stored unwashed and untrimmed in the refrigerator, where they will keep fresh for 1 to 2 weeks. Keeping them in perforated or loosely wrapped plastic will help them to retain moisture.

Recipe: Buttered Leeks, Braised Leeks with Parmesan, Potato Leek Soup

 

Sweet Onions

Grower: Blue Goose Farm

Store:  Sweet onions have a shorter shelf life than common varieties due to a higher water and sugar content. Thus, it’s important to store them properly. Ideally, sweet onions should be stored in a cool, dark, dry location and spread out for optimum air circulation. Most growers suggest placing onions in a clean pair of pantyhose, with knots tied in between each onion, then hung in a cool, dry place. Just snip off below each knot when you need one.  Stored properly, sweet onions should last in your pantry about ten days to two weeks.

Recipe: Recipe: Roasted Balsamic Sweet OnionsGrilled Sweet Onions

Green Kale

Grower: Clarion River Organics

Store: Store kale in the refrigerator, but in the coldest part of the fridge. Kale tends to get more and more bitter the longer it is left at room temperature, so keep it cool.  You can tightly wrap it in a paper towel and then place it in an air-tight bag

Recipe: Sauteed Kale, Spicy Kale & Ricotta Pie, Sesame Noodles with Broccoli and Kale

 

 

D’Anjou/Bosc Pears

Grower: Dawson’s Orchards

Store: Unlike other fruits, pears ripen from the inside out so by the time they are soft on the outside, the inside flesh may be overripe and mealy.  Ripe pears should be stored in a refrigerator set at 35 to 45 degrees.  Leave unripe pears at room temperature in order to induce ripening.  To speed up the ripening process, place pears in a brown paper bag. This traps ethylene (a naturally occurring gas) which pears produce as they ripen.  You can also place pears next to bananas or avocados in order to ripen them. Just like pears, both fruits naturally release ethylene as they ripen.

Recipe: Harvest Pear Crisp, Spiced Anjou Pear Bread

 

Winter Squash

Grower: Kistaco Farm

Store: Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated area for up to 1 month.

Recipe: Roasted Spaghetti Squash, Cinnamon Roasted Butternut Squash

 

 

 

Apple Cider

Grower: Kistaco Farm

Store:  Store apple cider in refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Recipe: Apple Cider Margarita, Apple Cider Donuts, Cinnamon Pear Tart

 

 

Broccoli

Grower: Nu Way Farm

Store:  Consume fresh broccoli as soon as you can as it will not keep long. To store, mist the unwashed heads, wrap loosely in damp paper towels, and refrigerate. Use within 2 to 3 days. Do not store broccoli in a sealed container or plastic bag.

Recipe: Roasted Lemon BroccoliBroccoli Quinoa Salad, Broccoli & Cheese Quiche

 

 

 

Sweet Potatoes

Grower: Riverbend Acres

Store: Avoid storing sweet potatoes in the refrigerator, which will produce a hard center and unpleasant taste. Instead, store your sweet potatoes in a cool, dry, well ventilated container. For best results, store them in a basement or root cellar away from strong heat sources. Your sweet potatoes can store for up to two weeks if stored properly.

Recipe: Sweet Potato Casserole, Sweet Potato Fritters, Sweet Potato Fries

 

 

Cabbage

Grower: Weeping Willow

Store: Keep it wrapped. Wrapping cabbage in plastic and storing it in the crisper section of your refrigerator limits its exposure to air flow, and thus reduces respiration and slows down spoilage. Just as importantly, plastic wrap keeps external moisture out, preventing mold and rot, while helping the cabbage to maintain its internal (cellular) moisture—without which, the cabbage leaves lose their firmness and begin to wilt.

Recipes: Beef & Cabbage Stir Fry, Garlic Roasted Cabbage Wedges

 

Summer CSA Week #21 Preview

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST

This is for the October 18th CSA, which is an odd week share

Carrots  Blue Goose Farm
Celebration Squash  Clarion River Organics
Sweet Onions – Crighton Farm/Blue Goose Farm
Sweet Banana Peppers – Gid’s Produce
Hydroponic Lettuce – Harmony Grove Farm
Jonagold Apples Kistaco Farm
Red Radishes – Nu Way Farm
Daikon Radishes – Riverbend Acres
Red Potatoes – Weeping Willow

 

Egg shares will receive eggs from Keim Farm

Cheese shares will receive Old Gold Raw Milk Cheese from Hidden Hills Dairy

**This week’s shares are Vegan and Gluten Free

 

 


Carrots

Grower: Blue Goose Farm

Store:  Carrots can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a month if stored properly. Cut off carrot greens, place carrots in a containers with lid and cover completely in water. Keep container in the refrigerator, changing the water ever 4-5 days.

Recipe: Carrot Pancakes, Carrot Coconut Soup, Curried Carrots

 

Celebration Squash

Grower: Clarion River Organics

Store: Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated area for up to 1 month.

Recipe: Roasted Maple Carnival Squash, Carnival Squash with Apples and Thyme

 

 

Sweet Onions

Grower: Crighton Farm

Store: Sweet onions have a shorter shelf life than common varieties due to a higher water and sugar content. Thus, it’s important to store them properly. Ideally, sweet onions should be stored in a cool, dark, dry location and spread out for optimum air circulation. Most growers suggest placing onions in a clean pair of pantyhose, with knots tied in between each onion, then hung in a cool, dry place. Just snip off below each knot when you need one.  Stored properly, sweet onions should last in your pantry about ten days to two weeks.

Recipe: Roasted Balsamic Sweet Onions, Grilled Sweet Onions, Sweet Onion Soup

 

Sweet Banana Peppers

Grower: Gid’s Produce

Store: Store the peppers in a tightly sealed plastic bag on the top shelf of the fridge (peppers store the best at between 45°F and 55°F). You can also freeze almost any kind of pepper for as long as a year; just seal them snugly in plastic bags. Frozen peppers will retain their flavor and heat, though their crunchy texture will be lost.

Recipe: Pickled Banana Peppers, Stuffed Banana Peppers

 

Hydroponic Lettuce

Grower: Harmony Grove Farm

Store: Leave the heads intact and unwashed until you use them. Then, place them in the crisper drawer in your fridge with some paper towels.They’ll absorb any excess moisture, so your lettuce doesn’t spoil prematurely.  Lettuce bruises easily, so be careful not to shove other foods up against it. Using a storage container is better than a bag, which can end up squished against other items.

 

 

 

Jonagold Apples

Grower: Kistaco Farm

Store: Keep them cool. The ideal storage temperature is 30 to 35 degrees F. with 90 to 95 percent relative humidity. If you don’t have a lot of apples, the refrigerator is a good option. Place them in the crisper drawer in a plastic bag with holes in it or cover theapples with a damp paper towel.

Recipe: Traditional Apple Pie, Jonagold Apple Cake, Baked Apples

 

French Breakfast Radish

Grower: Nu Way Farm

Store:  Store radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator and they should keep for at least a week. If your radishes have leaves attached, it is best to remove them, as they tend to leach moisture from the root.

Recipe: Buttered Radishes with Poached Egg, French Breakfast Radishes on Toast

 

 

Daikon Radish

Grower: Riverbend Acres

Store: Daikon is quite perishable, so if serving it raw try to use it within 4 days of purchase. If cooking daikon, it can be stored up about a week. Keep it in a perforated plastic bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Recipe: Chinese Braised Daikon Radish, Vietnamese Pickled Carrots and Daikon Radishes

 

Red Potatoes

Grower: Weeping Willow

Store: Store potatoes in a cool, well ventilated place. Colder temperatures lower than 50 degrees, such as in the refrigerator, cause a potato’s starch to convert to sugar, resulting in a sweet taste and discoloration when cooked.

Recipes: Garlic Red Potatoes, Roasted Herbed Red Potatoes

 

Week 16 Summer CSA Preview

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST

This is for the September 13th CSA, which is an even week share

Butternut Squash  Blue Goose Farm
Carrots  Clarion River Organics
Cipollini Onions – Crighton Farm
Bosc Pears* – Dawson’s Orchards
Canary Melons – Gid’s Produce
Sun Tan Bell Peppers** Gid’s Produce
Honeycrisp Apples* – Kistaco Farm
Italian Eggplant – Matthews Farm
Lettuce (Bibb or Red Leaf) – Nu Way
Carmen Peppers** – Weeping Willow Farm
Zucchini – Weeping Willow Farm

*Members will receive either Bosc Pears or Honeycrisp Apples

**Members will receive either Sun Tan Bell Peppers or Carmen Peppers

Egg shares will receive eggs from Keim Farm

Cheese shares will receive Buttercup raw milk cheese from Hidden Hills Dairy

**This week’s shares are Vegan and Gluten Free

 

 


Butternut Squash

Grower: Blue Goose Farm

Store:  You’ll see best storage results when you stash squash in a cool, dry spot. For most winter squash, store at 50º to 55º F with relative humidity of 60 to 70 percent.  Butternut squash can keep up to 13 weeks when stored.  If you cut up your butternut squash you can store it in the refrigerator in a closed container for 4 days, or you can freeze cut butternut squash and it will stay good for 6-12 months.

Recipe: Cinnamon Roasted Butternut Squash, Curry Roasted Butternut Squash and Chickpeas, Butternut Squash Risotto 

 

Carrots

Grower: Clarion River Organics

Store: Once the greens are trimmed off, all you have to do to keep the carrots crisp and fresh is put them in a container of water and store in the refrigerator! Whole carrots stay nice and crunchy in their cold water bath.

Recipe: Shredded Carrot Fritters, Roasted Carrots with Carrot Top Pesto, Curried Carrots with Pecans

 

Cipollini Onions

Grower: Crighton Farm

Store: Cipollinis are about the size of a golf ball with a slightly flattened appearance. They’re thin-skinned and have translucent white flesh with more residual sugar than your average yellow or white onion.  Store in a cool, dark, dry location.  Stored properly, onions should last in your pantry from 10 days to 2 weeks.

Recipe: Roasted Cipollini Onions, Balsamic Cipollini Onions, Caramelized Cipollini Onions 

 

Bosc Pears

Grower: Dawson’s Orchards

Store:Unlike other fruits, pears ripen from the inside out so by the time they are soft on the outside, the inside flesh may be overripe and mealy.  Ripe pears should be stored in a refrigerator set at 35 to 45 degrees.  Leave unripe pears at room temperature in order to induce ripening.  To speed up the ripening process, place pears in a brown paper bag. This traps ethylene (a naturally occurring gas) which pears produce as they ripen.  You can also place pears next to bananas or avocados in order to ripen them. Just like pears, both fruits naturally release ethylene as they ripen.

Recipe: Honey Roasted Bosc Pears, Pear Crisp

 

Canary Melons

Grower: Gid’s Produce 

The Canary melon is oval-shaped, with a smooth skin. When the melon is ripe, its hard rind turns bright yellow, it develops a corrugated look and a slightly waxy feel and its flesh will be pale ivory in color. The texture of the flesh is notably succulent, almost wet and semi firm, similar to a ripe pear. Within the flesh, the fruit bears a dry salmon-orange seed cavity. The melon possesses flavors both tangy and mildly sweet. Its aromatics linger with nuances of banana and pineapple and a slightly musky finish.

Recipe: Melon and Greens Salad, Canary Melon and Cilantro Salad

 

Peppers – Carmen Peppers and Bell Peppers

Grower: Weeping Willow and Gid’s Produce

Store: Store the peppers in a tightly sealed plastic bag on the top shelf of the fridge (peppers store the best at between 45°F and 55°F). You can also freeze almost any kind of pepper for as long as a year; just seal them snugly in plastic bags. Frozen peppers will retain their flavor and heat, though their crunchy texture will be lost—not a problem in the case of chiles destined for cooked dishes and salsas.

Recipe: Roasted Peppers with Herbs, Pasta with PeppersGrilled Eggplant and Carmen Pepper Pizza

 

Honeycrisp Apples

Grower: Kistaco Farm

Store: Apples should be stored as cold as possible. Keep them in the bottom drawer of the refrigerator. A perforated plastic bag works best, as it allows some of the moisture to escape while keeping the apples crisp.

Recipe: Honeycrisp Apple Crisp, Baked Honeycrisp Apples, Cinnamon Honeycrisp Apple Chips

 

Italian Eggplant

Grower: Matthews Farm

Store:  Keep eggplant in a cool spot, away from direct sunlight, and use it as soon as possible after harvesting or buying. You can place it in a vented bowl, but avoid sealing it in a plastic bag, which can increase decay.  Eggplant is highly sensitive to ethylene, a natural gas that causes certain foods to ripen (and eventually spoil) very quickly. So it’s best to keep eggplant stored separately from bananas, tomatoes, and melons, which are all high ethylene producers.

Recipe: Italian Style Eggplant Parmesan, Stuffed Italian Eggplant, Baba Ganoush

 

 

 

Lettuce

Grower: Nu Way 

Store: Store lettuce unwashed in a loosely closed plastic bag in the refrigerator. It should keep for 2 to 3 days. If you wash the leaves, dry them thoroughly, and refrigerate in a tightly sealed plastic bag, lettuce will last for about a week.

Recipe: Easy Garden Salad

 

 

Zucchini

Grower: Weeping Willow

Store: Store freshly picked, unwashed zucchini in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to one week. The bag should be perforated or loosely tied, not sealed tightly. Do not cut the zucchini until you are ready to use it or freeze it.

Recipes: Baked Parmesan Zucchini, Stuffed Zucchini

 

April 12 – CABIN FEVER – Week #2

THIS WEEK’S HARVEST

Check out the harvest for the upcoming week below!           CLICK THOSE TAGS  ^^^^^^^ For Recipes!

2# Carrots, Tuscarora Organic Growers Coop (OG)
Hydroponic Lettuce, Harmony Grove Farm
1/4# Scallions, Crighton Farm
3# Red Potatoes, Weeping Willow/Blue Goose Farm
Tomatillo Salsa, Penns Corner Farm Alliance
Root A: Parsnips, Tuscarora Organic Growers Coop
Root B: Turnips, Tuscarora Organic Growers Coop
2oz Easter Bear, Bedillions Honey Farm
(VEGAN ONLY) Mixed Greens, Puckerbrush Farm
G = Certified Organic, CNG = Certified Naturally Grown

Egg shares are from John Keim

Cheese shares will receive Curds and Chèvre from Riverview Dairy

**This week’s VEGAN shares will receive Mixed Greens from Puckerbrush Farm.  All shares are GLUTEN FREE!


2012/13 Winter Share, March 13th (#8)

An Artistic Approach to the CSA Model CSArt

By the New Hazlett Theater

You might be asking yourself, “What is a theater blogger doing in my CSA update?” Well, Penn’s Corner was gracious enough to give us — the New Hazlett Theater — a little space to tell you about a program we’re kicking off this summer.  If you haven’t heard of the New Hazlett, you should take a quick jaunt over to our website (www.newhazletttheater.org) and look at the amazing lineup of talented performers we bring to Pittsburgh’s Northside on a weekly basis.  Go ahead.  We’ll wait.

Back?  Great.  Now, let me ask you a question: what does a theater have in common with a farm share?  The answer is simple; we’re both in the business of cultivation.

Local CSA’s like Penn’s Corner cultivate their crops, yes, but they also cultivate the community that springs up around the farm.  As they provide sustenance to their neighbors, so too does the neighborhood support the farm.  Likewise, we here at the New Hazlett Theater cultivate art by providing the space and resources for performers to create, and just like a CSA, we look for ways to nurture our community of artists and arts patrons.

It’s this idea of community building that sparked our interest in a new form of arts patronage based on the farm share model.  We call it a CSA too, but our version stands for Community Supported Art, and its an exciting way for patrons to contribute directly to their local artists, nurturing the creation new performances.

Here’s how it works: for a $100 subscription, each CSA “shareholder” receives admission to six world-premier performances created over the course of one year.  Each work is fresh from the artists and delivered to you at the New Hazlett Theater starting this August.

Who’s on the line up?  We don’t know just yet, but the mystery is half the fun!

You see, we’ve just finished a lengthy application process that’s garnered enough entries for ten years’ worth of art, and now we’re in the process of picking out the best of the best, the cream of the crop.

We should have more information for you as our selection panelists make their decisions, but we can promise you that your New Hazlett Theater CSA box will be fresh, it will be new, and it will be cultivated with the support of our local community.

In case you cheated and skipped our website at the beginning of this post, I’ll give you the link again: www.newhazletttheater.org/#csa.  Go there to learn more about the program.  You can also find out how you can support homegrown entertainment, and if you sign up for our email list, you’ll be among the first to know which artists make it into our “box.”

We’ll see you at the show.

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Please keep these remaining delivery dates in mind: March 13th and March 27th. If ever deliveries are not able to be made due to driving conditions we will be sure to email you and to schedule a make up day as soon as possible.

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THIS WEEK’S HARVEST

 ~ 1/4# fresh spinach, Nu Way Farm~ puffed spelt, Clarion River Organics, OG

~ Bloody Mary Mix, Clarion River Organics, OG

~ bread and butter pickles, Kistaco Farm (PLEASE REFRIGERATED)

~ 1/2 gallon apple cider, Kistaco Farm

~ white cabbage head, Blue Goose Farm, CNG

~ 1 dozen eggs, Clarion River Organics/ Jarosinski’s

~ 1# popcorn, Hostetler’s Farm

~ Old Gold cheese, Hidden Hills Dairy

OG- Certified Organic    CNG- Certified Natural Grown
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Nu Way Farm’s turnips turned over the weekend with the warm weather so you won’t be finding them in your box.  We will make up for it in your next (and last) Winter Share box. 

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Returning Members can Sign up Here for your 2013 regular season CSA share now!

We are offering all of our regular options plus a bi-weekly share, an egg share and a flower share this year!  We love to deliver to workplaces, Universities and Community Centers.  Please contact Karlin if you are interested in hosting or have suggestions for new locations.

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Peanut Butter Granola

  • 1 1/2 cups rolled oats
  • 1 1/2 cups puffed brown rice cereal (use puffed spelt!)
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 6 Tbsp (1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp) smooth or crunchy all-natural peanut butter
  • 1 Tbsp canola oil
  • 2 Tbsp Turbinado sugar (or granulated sugar)
  • 2 Tbsp brown rice syrup (or other liquid sweetener, such as maple syrup, agave nectar, or honey)
  • 1/2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup unsalted raw or dry-roasted peanuts or any other nut
  1. Preheat oven to 325°F. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Measure the oats and rice cereal into a large bowl, set aside.
  3. In a medium bowl, whisk together the applesauce, peanut butter, oil, sugar, brown rice syrup, vanilla extract, and salt. Whisk until well-mixed.
  4. Pour wet ingredients over cereal and stir until evenly coated. Spread mixture on the prepared cookie sheet in an even layer.
  5. Bake for 15 minutes. Remove sheet from the oven, stir the peanuts into the granola, and bake for an additional 10-15 minutes, or until the granola is golden brown and crisp.
  6. Remove granola from the oven and cool completely. Store in an airtight container.

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Shakshuka [Eggs Poached in Spicy Tomato Sauce]

1/4 cup olive oil
5 Anaheim chiles or 3 jalapeños, stemmed, seeded, and finely chopped (I was nervous and only used 2 Anaheims; I would go for 3 or 4 next time for a more moderate but still gentle kick)
1 small yellow onion, chopped
5 cloves garlic, crushed then sliced
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 tablespoon paprika
1 28-ounce can whole peeled tomatoes, undrained (you can use the Penn’s Corner tomatoes if you still have them! Or sub in some of the Bloody Mary mix for a kick.)
Kosher salt, to taste
6 eggs
1/2 cup feta cheese, crumbled
1 tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley
Warm pitas, for serving

Heat oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat. Add chiles and onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft and golden brown, about 6 minutes. Add garlic, cumin, and paprika, and cook, stirring frequently, until garlic is soft, about 2 more minutes.

Put tomatoes and their liquid into a medium bowl and crush with your hands. Add crushed tomatoes and their liquid to skillet along with 1/2 cup water, reduce heat to medium, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until thickened slightly, about 15 minutes. Season sauce with salt.

Crack eggs over sauce so that eggs are evenly distributed across sauce’s surface. Cover skillet and cook until yolks are just set, about 5 minutes. Using a spoon, baste the whites of the eggs with tomato mixture, being careful not to disturb the yolk. Sprinkle shakshuka with feta and parsley and serve with pitas, for dipping.

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